Satellite Emitters monitored in the 136 to 138 MHz Band at Melbourne, Australia.

Version :  8 August 2014 - Meteor-M N2 mode change. See Note 17
                            
Name
Catalog
Number
COSPAR ID
Frequency
MHz
Modulation
Audio
(kB)
Notes
TRANSIT
965
1964-83D
136.653
FM/PM
118
Note 1.
SOLRAD 7B
1291
1965-16D
136.80
FM/AM
157
Note 2.
TIROS-10
1430
1965-51A
136.232
PM

approx 1280 Hz. Intermittent operation.
ALOUETTE-2
1804
1965-98A
136.08
136.59
136.98
FM
PM
CW

Note 18
ERS 15 2411
1966-77B
136.44
PM 466
1200-1300 Hz, approx. 8 sec period  Note 4 
ERS 20
2768
1967-40D
136.26
PM
156
910 Hz, 4 sec period Note 5
ISIS 1
3669
1969-9A
136.41
Carrier only


EGRS-13
3891
1969-37B
136.800
Carrier only
74 Note 3
S69-4
4237
1969-82E
137.41
Carrier only

Note 8
TIMATION-II
4256
1969-82B
137.383
FM/AM
79
Note 6.
SHINSEI
5485
1971-80A
136.695
Carrier only

Daylight only
NOSS
5680
1971-110C
137.08
Carrier only

Note 9.
TIROS-N
11060
1978-98A
137.77
Carrier only

on/off unmodulated carrier in daylight only
NOAA-9
15427
1984-123A
137.505
Carrier only

Usually with 136.77 MHz. Note 16.
ECS-4
18351
1987-78B
137.141
PCM/FSK/PM
78
Note 15
NOAA 15
25338
1998-30A
137.35
137.62
PCM/PM
AM/FM

DSB Note 10
APT Note 11
HAMSAT
28650
2005-17B
137.20
PCM/PSK/PM
84
256 bps on ± 25.6 kHz subcarrier sidebands & ±51.2 kHz unmodulated sidebands
NOAA-18
28654
2005-18A
137.35
137.9125
PCM/PM
AM/FM

DSB
APT 
NOAA-19
33591
2009-5A
137.77
137.10
PCM/PM
AM/FM

DSB
APT
Meteor-M N2
40069
2014-37A
137.100
QPSK

LRPT 72 kbps    Note 17
ORBCOMM
various
various
137.2000
137.2250
137.2500
137.4400
137.4600
137.6625
137.6875
137.7125
137.7375
137.8000
&
137.5600




SDPSK






OQPSK

4800 bps PCM Subscriber Communicator downlink.
Note 12.









57.6 kbps, 16 slot TDMA, Spacecraft to GES downlink. Note 12a.

Audio files are in .wav format, compressed to 8000, 8-bit, mono samples per second.
Two Line Elements (TLE) from Space-Track (USAF site) and Celestrak - Dr T. S. Kelso's NORAD format TLE site.
Name, Catalog number and COSPAR ID in bold have different names and numbers in TLEs.
Errors and Omissions are mine. Email corrections or suggestions.

Notes:

1
Launched on 13 Dec 1964 as the second operational TRANSIT spacecraft,  it should be more correctly called OSCAR -2, O-2 or NSS 30020. Unfortunately, the navigation system failed within 2 weeks of launch. The telemetry beacon can be CW or modulated depending on solar lighting conditions. The PAM data is 35 steps with a repeat cycle of about 12.5 seconds. Each step has a duty cycle of about 75% data value and 25% return to centre frequency value. These steps vary a 5400 Hz centre frequency sub carrier oscillator, IRIG 10, that then frequency modulates the RF carrier. Another SCO at 10.5 kHz, IRIG 12,  is sometimes present. It has a pattern of five pulses with gaps, followed by a longer gap at about a 1.5 Hz rate. A SSB receiver will resolve, separately, the carrier as a single tone and each of the sidebands as "musical" tones. Also see Maik Hermenau's TRANSIT 5B5 page
2
The telemetry is a multiplex of six IRIG-106 7.5% bandwidth sub carrier oscillators, linearly added and amplitude modulate the RF carrier. IRIG 3 (730 Hz centre frequency) and IRIG 4 (960 Hz cf) vary in step over 3.6 second with 8 periods of 450 millisecond each. IRIG 5 (1300 Hz cf), IRIG 6 (1700 Hz cf) and IRIG 7 (2300 Hz cf) are all fixed at their lower deviation limit of 1202 Hz, 1572 Hz and 2127 Hz respectively. IRIG 8 (3000 Hz) drifts from the the lower limit, 2775 Hz, to the upper limit, 3225 Hz, over time.
3
Previously had IRIG 3 SCO, 730 Hz c.f., 16 segment, .67s per segment, PAM/FM/PM telemetry or just 680 Hz or CW
EGRS (Electronic & Geodetic Ranging Satellite or Experimental Geodetic Research Satellite) with a SECOR (Sequential Collation of Range) transponder.
4
Called SECOR 7 by Space-Track. The telemetry is random levels of about 8 seconds duration each, on a 1300 Hz centre frequency SCO that amplitude modulates the RF carrier. The RF exhibits short term frequency instability.
5
ERS-20 aka  OV5-3, sounds like a "moan". OV5 series.
Unstable carrier (± 100 Hz), amplitude modulated with 910 Hz tone with approx. 4.6 second period.
It can be heard about an hour earlier every 2 days for up to 12 hours over a 3 to 4 week period with a repeat cycle of about 7 weeks.
An updated TLE was derived by Greg Roberts and Mike McCants in September 2007 
6
Called OPS 7613 P/L 1 by Space-Track. Telemetry is PAM/FM/AM. 4 SCOs (Ch 4 960 Hz,Ch 6 1700 Hz, Ch 7 2300 Hz and  Ch 8 3000 Hz centre frequencies). PAM is 30 levels plus a min and max calibration/sync pulses over 4 secs. Ch 4 floating, Ch 6 & 7 are repeating patterns, Ch 8 is a 4 Hz clock.
8
POPPY program declassified 12 Sept 2005 by NRO. Preliminarily called POPPY-6B, also known as OPS 7613 P/L 4 or NRL PL162.
Historically but incorrectly called S69-4
9
POPPY program declassified 12 sept 2005 by NRO. Preliminarily called POPPY-7B. also known as OPS 7898 P/L 2, previously thought to be US Navy Ocean Surveillance System (NOSS), Sub-Satellite  Unit C (SSU-C). TLEs from Mike McCants' classified section.
10
DSB - Direct Sounder Broadcast - 8320 bps TIROS Information Processor (TIP) data, Bi-phase-level encoded (Manchester), ±67° PM modulation, 1W, RHCP.
104, 8-bit words/minor frame. 20 bit sync code (EDE20 hex) + 4 bit S/C ID.
11
APT - Automatic Picture Transmission - 120 line/min Visible and Infrared video (1600 Hz BW) amplitude modulates a 2400 Hz carrier that then frequency modulates the 5W RF carrier, deviation is ±17 kHz. RHCP, ½ turn, ½ wavelength resonant quadrifilar antenna (boom deployed VRA on TIROS-N series spacecraft)
12
ORBCOMM spacecraft are frequency agile and may, can and do vary their downlink frequency on a orbit by orbit basis.
48 spacecraft  have been launched. These are
Flight Model 1 to 28, 30 to 36 (now called OG1 models) of which FM 1, 2, 3, 17, 22, 24, 25 26, 28 & 33 are not transmitting or have failed.
FM 29 was Concept Demonstration Satellite 3 and FM 37 to FM 41 were Quick Launch 1 to 5. All have failed.
FM 101  OG2 model, launched 8 Oct 2012, decayed 10 Oct 2012
FM 103, 104, 106, 107, 109 & 111 OG2 model launched 14 July 2014
12a
A Gateway Earth Station (NCC ID 120 (78 hex)) opened early 2007 at Rutherglen, Australia, about 250 km North of my location.
Multiple 125 msec bursts, 1 sec apart,  on 137.56 MHz
Photo  GoogleEarth Placemark
15
ECS-4 (EUTELSAT 1F4) re-orbited above geostationary orbit December 2002, now drifting westward at approximately 5° per day.
Telemetry is 160 bps NRZ TDM PCM data, Bi-Phase-L coded, BPSK on 2560 Hz subcarrier, PM on 137.1420 MHz at 8 Watts.
Signal has deteriorated over the past year, now 5-10 minute carrier on with or without data subcarrier and 50-80 minutes carrier off.
Next period of visibility in Melbourne, Australia is 31/7/2014 to 12/8/2014, 60° peak on 25/8/2014
16
The 136 and 137 MHz carriers are on for about 25% of a sunlt pass.
NOAA-9-2011-5-16-0718.JPG
17
Rate ½, k = 7 Convolution coded, I = G1, Q = G2, Power I:Q = 1:1, Symbol Rate 72 or 80 kilosymbols per second
CCSDS Format. SCID 00, VCID 05 with 3 out of APIDs 64 to 69,  (MSU-MR channels 1 to 6)  or VCID 63, Fill
Uses either 72 kbps mode or 80 kbps Metop LRPT mode  with UW Insertion .
Uses either 137.10 or 137.90 MHz
Recent activity:
08 July 2014 Meteor-M N2 launched with LRPT off
21 July 2014 LRPT on, 137.10 Mhz, 72 kbps mode, APID 64, 65 & 66
23 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.90 MHz, 72 kbps mode
24 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.10.MHZ, 72 kbps mode, APID 67, 68 & 69
25 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.10 MHz, 80 kbps mode
28 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.90 MHZ, 72 kbps mode
30 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.90 MHz, 80 kbps mode
31 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.10 MHz, 72 kpbs mode
01 July 2014 LRPT changed to 137.10 MHz, 80 kbps mode
04 Aug  2014 LRPT changed to 137.90 MHz, 80 kbps mode
05 Aug  2014 LRPT changed 72 kbps mode APID 64, 65 & 66
06 Aug  2014 LRPT changed 80 kbps mode
07 Aug  2014
10 UTC LRPT changed to 72 kbps mode, APID 67, 68 & 69
07 Aug  2014
22 UTC LRPT changed to 80 kbps mode
08 Aug  2014 10 UTC LRPT changed to 72 kbps mode
08 Aug  2014 22 UTC LRPT changed to 80 kbps mode
14 Aug  2014 21 UTC LRPT changed to 72 kbps mode
, APID 64, 65 & 66
18
Alouette-2 on 136.59 MHz re-discovered by Raydel of Cuba in early August 2013.
Subsequently found to be  transmitting on 136.08 and 136.98 MHz as well.
136.08 MHz was a Wideband FM system for Sounder data with two sub-carriers, 22 and 30 kHz, FM/FM, 4W, 100 kHz bandwidth,
136.59 MHz was a Narrowband PM system for Experiment Data on 4 sub-carriers,3.9, 5.4. 14.5 & 22 kHz, PAM/FM/PM, 2 W, 50 kHz bandwidth and
136.98 MHz was a 100 mW CW tracking beacon

Spacecraft no longer heard  but still monitored occasionally
Frequency
Last Heard
PROSPERO (1971 Paper, 1973 Paper ,1975 Paper)
137.560
November 2003
MEGSAT-1  2000-57B/26546  1200 bps  PCM/PM   telemetry   Audio file 305
137.905
December 2011
NOAA 16 2000-55A/26536  137.770
June 2014
Meteor-M N1  35865  2009-49A  Audio file 282
72 kbps Mode or 80 ksps Metop LRPT format and 137.10 MHz or 137.90 MHz
Recent activity:  Jun 2014 LRPT off, Meteor-M N1 decommissioned?
137.900
June 2014

Introduction

In 1986, there was an article by Greg Roberts in JESAUG entitled "Satellite Transmitting Status" that listed over 40 satellites that were reportedly transmitting in the VHF band of 136 to 138 MHz.  I had for some time being receiving APT from NOAA and METEOR weather satellites and had noticed various other signals (emitters) showing up at other times. Armed with this list of satellites and by manually  logging times and frequencies, I was able to put names to some of those emitters. I then had to obtained TLEs from the NASA GSFC RAID EBB via 300 bps modem and international dial-up (not cheap !).

I have limited my observations to the 136-138 MHz band. This is due to the requirement to have a bandpass cavity filter inserted between the crossed dipole antenna and the pre-amplifier to reduce RFI and cross modulation products. My location is between a freeway and 220 kV power transmission lines, in a suburb of the second largest city in Australia. It is NOT the most ideal site to monitor 50 mW of RF from LEO !!!

Telemetry is received via a vertically mounted, 2 element crossed dipole antenna, a  triple cavity filter, a pre-amp and a communications receiver.
The audio is analysed with Spectrogram software.

Early References:

"Radio Transmissions from Outer Space", Greg Roberts, ZS1B1, AMSAT-US Journal, March, 1980.
"Some Radio Transmission Observed in the 136-138 MHz Band between 1978 and 1984", G. Roberts, Chapter 11, Table 11.5, The Satellite Experimenter's Handbook, ARRL, 1985.
"Satellite Transmitting Status", Gregory Roberts, Journal of Environmental Satellite Amateur Users Group (JESAUG), pp.10-13, Vol 4 No 3, 86-3, 1986.
"Satellite Radio Transmissions: 136-138 MHz", Chapter 14, Table 14-10, The Satellite Experimenter's Handbook, 2nd Edition, ARRL, 1990.
"Space Frequency Listing, 136-137 MHz Downlink" and "Space Frequency Listing, 137-138 MHz Downlink" , Sven Grahn.